Particracy

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Not to be confused with Patriarchy.

"The two great political parties of the nation have existed for the purpose, each in accordance with its own principles, of undertaking to serve the interests of the whole nation. Their members of the Congress are chosen with that great end in view."

Particracy or Rule of the Parties is a government system in which political power is concentrated within political parties. The term is usually a pejorative against representative democracies in which the representatives are not seen as actually representing their constituents or those who voted for them but rather the interests of the political parties they belong to.

Although advocacy for a particracy could be seen as being something one could unironically advocate for, in the form of a one-party state (vanguardism).

Conceptions

One-Party States

One way in which particracy has been historically implemented is in the form of a One-Party State. This is also the only form of particracy that is likely to be sincerely advocated for. One-party states are states governed by one major political party, and all other parties are either banned or hold little power. While one-party states have been led by parties of many different ideologies, some of the most common examples are countries led by Marxist-Leninist (such as the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, the Communist Party of China, and the Communist Party of Cuba), Ba'athist or fascist (such as the Nazi Party of Germany, the National Fascist Party of Italy, and the Fatherland Front Party of Austria) parties.

Dominant-Party System

A Dominant-Party System is when one party dominates politics for a long time, allowing some degree of controlled opposition. It can be seen as a weaker, informal version of the one-party state, however, the systems they operate in are still nominally democratic and the party can be replaced, but it is usually very hard. Examples include People's Action Party of Singapore, Institutional Revolutionary Party of Mexico (historically), FIDESZ, and Law and Justice Party.

Two-Party Systems

Another way in which particracy has been historically and still currently implemented is in the form of a Two-Party System. Two-party systems are systems where two parties (usually one broadly left-leaning and one broadly right-leaning) dominate the political landscape, with power shifting back and forth between both. While other parties often hold some seats in the legislature, they are unlikely to be a significant enough bloc, with coalition governments being rare. Countries like the United States are extreme examples where third party or independent representatives are almost non-existent at both the federal and state level. This has resulted in both parties having different ideological factions in the hopes of somewhat increasing political diversity and having a more broad appeal. This is usually the result of a traditional first-past-the-post voting system, where high amounts of tactical voting due to it being a plurality-based system will result in most people only voting for one of the two parties (otherwise known as Duverger's law), but this isn't necessarily the case; two-party systems or characteristics of a two-party system can also sometimes be found in other voting systems, that is proportional systems, due to the rule of Gibbard’s theorem that if a deterministic voting rule is neither dictatorial nor susceptible to tactical voting, it must limit the possible outcomes to two (relevant) alternatives only. Prominent examples of two-party systems are the US Democratic/ Republican Party, the Canadian Liberal/ Conservative Party, and the Australian Liberal/ Labor Party (in the House of Representatives).

Codominant-Party System

A Codominant-Party System is when the same several, usually two, parties dominate politics for a long time. It can be seen as a weaker, informal version of the two-party system, in other words, the case where two-party systems or characteristics of a two-party system are found in other voting systems, that is proportional systems, due to the rule of Gibbard’s theorem that if a deterministic voting rule is neither dictatorial nor susceptible to tactical voting, it must limit the possible outcomes to two (relevant) alternatives only. Examples include the UK Conservative/ Labour Party, the Australian Liberal/ Labor Party (in the Senate), the New Zealand Labour/ National Party, the South Korean People Power Party/ Democratic Party of Korea, the Taiwanese Democratic Progressive Party/ Kuomintang, and the Spanish Spanish Socialist Workers' Party/ People's Party.

Partitocrazia

Multiparty Democracy

Multiparty Democracy is a form of particracy where the government is in control of multiple political parties.

How to Draw

Flag of Particracy
  1. Draw a ball.
  2. Fill it with white.
  3. Draw the symbol shown on the flag below, which is a half ring alternating between green, red, yellow, blue and black.
  4. Draw in the eyes.

You're done!

Relations

Friends

Frenemies

  • Democracy - You can be based sometimes but your direct democracy form is ultra cringe.
  • Helvetic Model - You still have parties and all, but what the hell is that "popular initiative" bullshit?
  • Satirism - You should really cut it out with that 'frivolous party'. Zelensky's pretty based though.

Enemies

  • Washingtonism - Haha 2 party system go GOP/DEM.
  • Absolute Monarchism - Why do you ban political parties most of the time?
    • Who needs a party when you have a family?
    • How about both?
  • Gaddafism - You banned parties and you think you're democratic.
  • Metaxism - This idiot banned his own party.
  • Lukashenkoism - Why does this non-party despot use the aesthetics of the one-party USSR? I have no idea.
  • Ochlocracy - Direct democracy just went mad.
  • Anarchism - You want no rule - cringe!
  • Post-Leftism - Yep, this is even more cringe.
  • Autonomism - He also hates parties and hangs out with him sometimes.
  • Autarchy - Every person a state? What the heck?
  • Tribalism - Get civilized, you savages.

Further Information

Wikipedia

Examples

Both modern and historical examples are included.

Parties of one-party states

Parties of dominant-party systems

Parties of two-party/codominant-party systems

Gallery

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